Thứ Bảy, 12 tháng 8, 2017

AUGUST 13, 2017 : NINETEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 115

At the mountain of God, Horeb,
Elijah came to a cave where he took shelter. 
Then the LORD said to him,
"Go outside and stand on the mountain before the LORD;
the LORD will be passing by." 
A strong and heavy wind was rending the mountains
and crushing rocks before the LORD—
but the LORD was not in the wind. 
After the wind there was an earthquake—
but the LORD was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake there was fire—
but the LORD was not in the fire. 
After the fire there was a tiny whispering sound. 
When he heard this,
Elijah hid his face in his cloak
and went and stood at the entrance of the cave.

Responsorial PsalmPS 85:9, 10, 11-12, 13-14
R. (8) Lord, let us see your kindness, and grant us your salvation.
I will hear what God proclaims;
the LORD — for he proclaims peace.
Near indeed is his salvation to those who fear him,
glory dwelling in our land.
R. Lord, let us see your kindness, and grant us your salvation.
Kindness and truth shall meet;
justice and peace shall kiss.
Truth shall spring out of the earth,
and justice shall look down from heaven.
R. Lord, let us see your kindness, and grant us your salvation.
The LORD himself will give his benefits;
our land shall yield its increase.
Justice shall walk before him,
and prepare the way of his steps.
R. Lord, let us see your kindness, and grant us your salvation.

Reading 2ROM 9:1-5
Brothers and sisters:
I speak the truth in Christ, I do not lie;
my conscience joins with the Holy Spirit in bearing me witness
that I have great sorrow and constant anguish in my heart. 
For I could wish that I myself were accursed and cut off from Christ
for the sake of my own people,
my kindred according to the flesh. 
They are Israelites;
theirs the adoption, the glory, the covenants,
the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises;
theirs the patriarchs, and from them,
according to the flesh, is the Christ,
who is over all, God blessed forever. Amen.

AlleluiaCF. PS 130:5
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I wait for the Lord;
my soul waits for his word.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

After he had fed the people, Jesus made the disciples get into a boat
and precede him to the other side,
while he dismissed the crowds. 
After doing so, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray. 
When it was evening he was there alone. 
Meanwhile the boat, already a few miles offshore,
was being tossed about by the waves, for the wind was against it. 
During the fourth watch of the night,
he came toward them walking on the sea. 
When the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified. 
"It is a ghost," they said, and they cried out in fear. 
At once Jesus spoke to them, "Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid." 
Peter said to him in reply,
"Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water." 
He said, "Come." 
Peter got out of the boat and began to walk on the water toward Jesus. 
But when he saw how strong the wind was he became frightened;
and, beginning to sink, he cried out, "Lord, save me!" 
Immediately Jesus stretched out his hand and caught Peter,
and said to him, "O you of little faith, why did you doubt?" 
After they got into the boat, the wind died down. 
Those who were in the boat did him homage, saying,
"Truly, you are the Son of God."


19th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Cycle A

Note: Where a Scripture text is underlined in the body of this discussion, it is recommended that the reader look up and read that passage.

1st Reading - 1 Kings 19:9a, 11-13a


The nineteenth chapter of 1st Kings is the Elijah story which has close parallels with the story of Moses on the same mountain (Sinai/Horeb). Both journey to the mountain to meet God; Moses while fleeing from the Egyptians, and Elijah while fleeing from Jezebel. Both even receive miraculous rations in route (manna and bread). In today’s reading we hear of Elijah’s encounter with God.

[At the mountain of God, Horeb, Elijah] 9a came to a cave, where he took shelter. 11 Then the LORD said, “Go outside and stand on the mountain before the LORD; the LORD will be passing by.” A strong and heavy wind was rending the mountains and crushing rocks before the LORD – but the LORD was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake – but the LORD was not in the earthquake. 12 After the earthquake there was fire – but the LORD was not in the fire. After the fire there was a tiny whispering sound. 13a When he heard this, Elijah hid his face in his cloak and went and stood at the entrance of the cave.

That the Lord is not in the mighty wind, the earthquake, or the fire, but rather in the gentle whisper is a lesson for the prophet. God, in His own way without great fanfare will work His will for Israel. Notice that Elijah does not come out until the calamities have passed. Hiding his face in his cloak may be a method of self-preservation: who can look upon God’s face and live (Exodus 33:20).

2nd Reading - Romans 9:1-5


Having heard Saint Paul describe the future glory that awaits those who live the Christian life empowered by the Spirit and that we are more than conquerors; with the gift of faith, nothing can separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus, Saint Paul now laments for the Jews who have failed to recognize the messiah; those with whom Paul had worshiped before his conversion.

1 I speak the truth in Christ,

Saint Paul is swearing an oath. He has no resentment against Jews who may have caused him trouble or charged him with disloyalty.

I do not lie; my conscience joins with the holy Spirit in bearing me witness 2 that I have great sorrow and constant anguish in my heart.

He is saddened at the condition of his fellow kinsmen.

“Since it appears that earlier he was speaking against the Jews, who thought that they were justified by the law, Paul now shows his desire and love for them and says that his conscience bears witness in Christ Jesus and in the Holy Spirit.” [The Ambrosiaster (ca. A.D. 366-384), Commentaries on Thirteen Pauline Epistles Romans 9,2]

3    For I could wish that I myself were accursed and separated from Christ for the sake of my brothers, my kin according to the flesh.

Paul would bear the curse himself, be cut off from Christ, for the sake of his fellow Jews. This is an echo of Moses’ prayer for the unruly Israelites (Exodus 32:32), that they may be forgiven.

“Why be surprised that the apostle desires to be cursed for his brethren’s sake, when he who is in the form of God emptied Himself and took on the form of a servant and was made a curse for us (see Philippians 2:6-8)? Why be surprised if, when Christ became a curse for His servants, one of His servants should become a curse for his brethren?” [Origen (post A.D. 244), Commentaries on Romans]

4    They are Israelites; theirs the adoption, the glory, the covenants, the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises; 5 theirs the patriarchs,

Instead of the common political title “Jews,” Paul makes use of their honorific religious title, “Israelites,” bestowed by Yahweh Himself on His people (Genesis 32:28). He then proceeds to recount the seven historic prerogatives associated with this name:

1)    “Adoption” – Sonship: Israel is the adopted son of God (Exodus 4:22).
2)    “Glory” – The resplendent manifestation of Yahweh’s presence to Israel in the desert and in the Jerusalem Temple (Exodus 16:10; 40:34; 1 Kings 8:10-11).
3)    “Covenants” – The covenants made with the patriarchs (Genesis 15:18; Exodus 24:7-8; Sirach 44:12, 18).
4)    “Giving of the Law” – The Torah, the expression of God’s will given to Moses (Exodus 20:1-17; Deuteronomy 5:1-22).
5)    “Worship” – Cult: The awesome worship of Yahweh in the Temple; so different from the idolatrous worship of Israel’s neighbors, which often included prostitution and human sacrifice.
6)    “Promises” – The promises made to Abraham (Genesis 12:12; 21:12), Moses (Deuteronomy 18:18-19, David (2 Samuel 7:11-16).
7)    “Patriarchs” – Israel’s ancestral heritage. It still worships the God of its fathers; Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (see Romans 11:28).


and from them, according to the flesh, is the Messiah.

To this summary of Israel’s seven historic privileges, Saint Paul adds an eighth, the climax: “Messiah” – The descendent par excellence. The messiah is their greatest title to glory, but unfortunately is not recognized as such.

God who is over all be blessed forever.
The best rendering of this verse is “who is above all things, God, blessed forever” which was interpreted for the first eight centuries to mean Christ is physically descended, who is above all things, God, blessed forever.

Amen.

Gospel - Matthew 14:22-23

Last week we heard the feeding of the five thousand. This week’s reading begins where we left off last week as we hear of Jesus’ walking on water. Even though the apostles saw Jesus walking on the water, Peter wanted further proof “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” To which Jesus gives a simple reply: “Come”. How strong is our faith? Do we ask Jesus to prove His presence by His actions: “Jesus, cure me of my illness... let me win the lottery ... protect my children in school... stop the violence in our communities...” What happens if our favors aren’t granted? Do we waiver in our faith as Peter did? Or do we keep on going and ask again, and again, and again? Our faith in Jesus is a gift to be cherished and practiced. If we practice our faith every day, we don’t risk drowning in doubt as Peter almost did.

22 Then he made the disciples get into the boat and precede him to the other side,

Crossing to the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee (Lake Genesareth) would have them entering Gentile territory.

while he dismissed the crowds. 23 After doing so, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray.

Jesus’ solitary nocturnal prayer is a model for all Christians – besides prayer in common, we also need time for personal prayer.

When it was evening he was there alone. 24 Meanwhile the boat, already a few miles offshore,

The previous New American translation was “several hundred yards offshore”. Mark says the boat was in the middle of the sea. Matthew actually says “many stadia” and a stadia is about 200 yards.

was being tossed about by the waves, for the wind was against it.


In this scene the headwinds could represent the hostile forces of the world which will buck them every step of the way.

25    During the fourth watch of the night, he came toward them, walking on the sea.

In Canaanite myth and in the Old Testament, the Lord overcomes the waves of death (Psalm 79:19; Job 9:8; 38:16; Isaiah 43:16; Sirach 24:5-6).

26    When the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified. “It is a ghost,” they said, and they cried out in fear.

In Mark, the wind stops and the disciples are astonished. In Matthew’s account the disciples are still without understanding.

27    At once (Jesus) spoke to them, “Take courage, it is I;

Literally, “I Am”. Jesus shares in the divine power.

do not be afraid.” 28 Peter said to him in reply, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” 29 He said, “Come.” Peter got out of the boat and began to walk on the water toward Jesus.

Peter, as leader of the apostles, sets the example.

30    But when he saw how (strong) the wind was he became frightened; and, beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!”

Peter has responsibilities not shared by the others. If he is to meet these responsibilities he must have faith.

31    Immediately Jesus stretched out his hand and caught him, and said to him, “O you of little faith, why did you doubt?” 32 After they got into the boat, the wind died down. 33 Those who were in the boat did him homage, saying, “Truly, you are the Son of
God.”

This ending is quite different from Mark’s. Mark doesn’t have Peter walking on water. Instead, when Jesus climbs into the boat the Apostles are amazed – because their hearts are hardened and they don’t understand the significance or Jesus’ divinity.

St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, Picayune, MS http://www.scborromeo.org


Meditation:  "It is I - have no fear"
Does the Lord Jesus seem distant when trials or adversity come your way? It was at Jesus' initiative that the disciples sailed across the lake, only to find themselves in a life-threatening storm. Although they were experienced fishermen, they feared for their lives. While Jesus was not with them in the boat, he, nonetheless watched for them in prayer. When he perceived their trouble he came to them on the sea and startled them with his sudden appearance. Do you look for the Lord's presence when you encounter difficulty or challenges?
Fight fear with faith
This dramatic incident on the sea of Galilee revealed Peter's character more fully than others. Here we see Peter's impulsiveness - his tendency to act without thinking of what he was doing. He often failed and came to grief as a result of his impulsiveness. In contrast, Jesus always bade his disciples to see how difficult it was to follow him before they set out on the way he taught them. A great deal of failure in the Christian life is due to acting on impulse and emotional fervor without counting the cost. Peter, fortunately in the moment of his failure clutched at Jesus and held him firmly. Every time Peter fell, he rose again. His failures only made him love the Lord more deeply and trust him more intently. 
The Lord keeps watch over us at all times, and especially in our moments of temptation and difficulty. Do you rely on the Lord for his strength and help? Jesus assures us that we have no need of fear if we trust in Him and in his great love for us. When calamities or trials threaten to overwhelm you, how do you respond? With faith and hope in God's love, care and presence with you?
"Lord Jesus, help me to trust you always and to never doubt your presence and your power to help me. In my moments of doubt and weakness, may I cling to you as Peter did. Strengthen my faith that I may walk straight in the path you set before me, neither veering to the left nor to the right".
Daily Quote from the early church fathersWelcoming the Lord Jesus with expectant faith and humility, by Augustine of Hippo, 354-430 A.D.
"While human praise does not tempt the Lord, people are often ruffled and nearly entranced by human praise and honors in the church. Peter was afraid on the sea, terrified by the great force of the storm. Indeed, who does not fear that voice: 'Those who say you are happy place you in error and disturb the path of your feet' (Isaiah 3:12 Vulgate translation)? And since the soul struggles against the desire for human praise, it is good for it to turn to prayer and petition amid such danger, lest one who is charmed by praise be overcome by criticism and reproach. Let Peter, about to sink in the waves, cry out and say, 'Lord, save me!' The Lord reached out his hand. He chided Peter, saying, 'O man of little faith, why did you doubt?'  - that is, why did you not, gazing straight at the Lord as you approached, pride yourself only in him? Nevertheless he snatched Peter from the waves and did not allow him who was declaring his weakness and asking the Lord for help to perish." (excerpt from SERMON 75:10)

NINETEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
SUNDAY, AUGUST 13, MATTHEW 14:22-33

(1 Kings 19:9a,11-13a; Psalms 85; Romans 9:1-5)

KEY VERSE: "O you of little faith, why did you doubt" (v 31).
TO KNOW: After Jesus revealed himself as the one who nourished his people with the miraculous multiplication of loaves (Mt 14:13-20), he demonstrated that he was victorious over the destructive powers of evil. Jesus had sent his disciples in a boat ahead of him while he went up a hill to pray. When it grew late, a turbulent storm arose on the lake. Jesus saw his disciples struggling against the winds and the waves, making little progress. As the night wore on, Jesus came toward his terrified disciples, walking on the sea, evoking the victory that enabled Israel to cross the sea into the Promised Land (Ps 77:20). Jesus told his disciples to take courage; he was with them ("Emmanuel"). Peter, the leader of the struggling community, tried to come to the Lord, but he was overwhelmed by fear. At Jesus' command, Peter stepped forward in faith, but when he took his eyes off Jesus, he began to sink beneath the waves and cried out, "Lord, save me!" (v 30b). Grasping Peter by the hand Jesus asked, "Why did you doubt?" (v 31b). Those who lacked faith now declared Jesus to be the "Son of God" (v 33b). Matthew intended his readers to see the storm-tossed boat as a symbol of the Church contesting the forces that threatened to engulf them.
TO LOVE: What is it that "drowns" me in fear, discouragement or sadness today?
TO SERVE: Lord Jesus, help me to keep my eyes on you in all the storms of life.​


Sunday 13 August 2017

Week III Psalter. 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time.
1 Kings 19:9, 11-13. Psalm 84(85):9-14. Romans 9:1-5. Matthew 14:22-33.
Lord, show us your mercy and love, and grant us your salvation — Psalm 84(85):9-14.
‘When evening came, he was there alone.’
After a hard day’s labour, Jesus needs time to rest and pray. We too could use this same inspiration after a hard day’s work, a difficult time, a challenging situation or a time of struggle or indecision.
The disciples were terrified at seeing Jesus walk on the water, but he tells them to have courage. Peter endeavours to go to Jesus. His faith decreases as the wind picks up, and he begins to sink. Does that sometimes feel like us? Do we start sinking when circumstances get difficult and the result we hope for isn’t realised as quickly as we wished and we lose sight of our goal?
In times of difficulty let us pray for courage so that we don’t sink under the weight of our troubles. Jesus is always there to strengthen us and provide a way.


ST. PONTIAN AND ST. HIPPOLYTUS

St. Pontian became Pope in the year 230. Five years later, after Pope Urban I, he was exiled to the mines of the Italian island of Sardinia during a period of Christian persecution. There, he decided to resign from his papal office and died a martyr for the faith.
Hippolytus was a priest and well-respected theologian in the early third century. But in 217 he rebelled against the Church when Callistus became Pope. He, too, was exiled in 235 to the Sardinian mines, where he met Pontian. Pontian helped Hippolytus reconcile with the Church bevore he died, and Hippolytus, too, died as a martyr. His writings were important, including "A Refutation of All Heresies", "Song of Songs", and "The Apostolic Tradition".


LECTIO DIVINA: 19TH SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME (A)
Lectio Divina: 
 Sunday, August 13, 2017
Jesus walks on the sea

Matthew 14, 22-33
1. Opening prayer
Come Holy Spirit, my life is going through a storm, the egoistic winds impel me where I do not wish to go, I cannot resist their force. I am weak and deprived of strength. You are the energy which gives life. You are my comfort, my force and my cry of prayer. Come, Holy Spirit, reveal to me the sense of the Scriptures, give me peace anew, serenity and the joy of living.
2. Lectio
a) Key to the reading:
Jesus and his Disciples are on the side of the lake, at night fall, after the multiplication of the loaves. Part of the passage is also found in Mark (6, 45-52) and in John (6, 16-21). The episode of Peter (vv. 28-32) is found only in Matthew. Some commentators hold that it is a question of an apparition of Jesus after the Resurrection (Lk 24, 37). The difficulties of the Church and the need for a greater faith in the Risen Jesus are thus foreshadowed.
b) A possible division of the Text:
Matthew 14, 22-23: related to the multiplication of the loaves
Matthew 14, 24-27: Jesus walks on the sea
Matthew 14, 28-32: the episode of Peter
Matthew 14, 33: the profession of faith.
c) Text:
22 And at once he made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side while he sent the crowds away. 23 After sending the crowds away he went up into the hills by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, 24 while the boat, by now some furlongs from land, was hard pressed by rough waves, for there was a head-wind. 25 In the fourth watch of the night he came towards them, walking on the sea, 26 and when the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified. 'It is a ghost,' they said, and cried out in fear. 27 But at once Jesus called out to them, saying, 'Courage! It's me! Don't be afraid.' 28 It was Peter who answered. 'Lord,' he said, 'if it is you, tell me to come to you across the water.' 29 Jesus said, 'Come.' Then Peter got out of the boat and started walking towards Jesus across the water, 30 but then noticing the wind, he took fright and began to sink. 'Lord,' he cried, 'save me!' 31 Jesus put out his hand at once and held him. 'You have so little faith,' he said, 'why did you doubt?' 32 And as they got into the boat the wind dropped. 33 The men in the boat bowed down before him and said, 'Truly, you are the Son of God.'
3. A Moment of prayerful silence
A desire to keep silence and to listen to God’s voice.
Some questions:
In moments of darkness and interior storms, how do I react? How are the presence and absence of the Lord integrated in me? What place does personal prayer and dialogue with God have in me?
What do we ask the Lord in a dark night? A miracle, that he frees us from this? A greater faith? In which attitudes am I similar to Peter?
4. Meditatio
Brief commentary
22. And at once he made the disciples get into the boat and go ahead to the other side while he sent the crowds away.
The multiplication of the loaves (14, 13-21) could have generated in the disciples triumphant expectations concerning the Kingdom of God. Therefore, Jesus orders them at once to get away. He ‘obliged’, usually a verb of strong significance. The people acclaim Jesus as a Prophet (Jn 6, 14-15) and wish to make him a political ruler. The disciples are easily drawn by this (Mk 6, 52; Mt 16, 5-12), there is the risk of allowing themselves to be drawn by the enthusiasm of the people. The disciples have to abandon this situation.
23. After sending the crowds away he went up into the hills by himself to pray. When evening came he was there alone. 
Jesus finds himself in front a situation in which the Galilean crowd becomes enthusiastic because of the miracle and runs the risk of not understanding His mission. In this very important moment, Jesus withdraws alone in prayer, as in Gethsemane (Mt 26, 36-46).
24. While the boat, by now some furlongs from land, was hard pressed by rough waves, for there was a head-wind.
This verse where the boat is noticed, without Jesus, in danger, can be close to verse 32 where the danger ceases when Jesus and Peter get into the boat.
25. In the fourth watch of the night he came towards them, walking on the sea. 
Jesus appears to his disciples in an extraordinary way. He transcends the human limitations, he has authority on creation. He acts as God alone can do it (Job 9, 8; 38, 16).
26. And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified. ‘It is a ghost’, they said, and cried out in fear. 
The disciples were struggling with the contrary wind, they had lived a very impressing day and now a sleepless night. At night (between three and six), in the middle of the sea, they were really terrified in seeing one coming towards them. They did not think in the possibility that it could be Jesus. Their vision is too human , and they believe in ghosts (Lk 24, 37). The Risen Lord though, has overcome the force of chaos represented by the waves of the sea.
27. But at once Jesus called out to them, saying. ‘Courage! It is me! Do not be afraid!. 
The presence of Jesus drives away all fear (9, 2.22). In saying “It is me” he evokes his identity (Es 3, 14) and manifests the power of God (Mk 14, 62; Lk 24, 39; Jn 8, 58; 18, 5-6). Fear is overcome by faith.
28. It was Peter who answered: ‘Lord, he said, ‘If it is you, tell me to come to you across the water’. 
Peter seems to want still another confirmation of the presence of Jesus. He asks for a sign.
29. Jesus said, ‘Come’. Then Peter got out of the boat and started walking towards Jesus across the water. 
Nevertheless, Peter is ready to run the risk, getting out of the boat and trying to walk on the agitated waves, in the midst of a strong wind (v. 24). He faces the risk of believing in the Word: ‘Come’.
30. But then noticing the wind, he took fright and began to sink: ‘Lord’, he cried, ‘save me!’ 
Perseverance is also necessary in the choice of faith. The contrary forces (the wind) are so many, that there is the risk of sinking. The prayer of petition saves him..
31. Jesus put out his hand at once and held him. ‘You have so little faith, he said, ‘why did you doubt?’ 
Peter is not left alone in his weakness. In the storms of Christian life we are not alone. God does not abandon us even if apparently is absent and does nothing.
32. And as they got into the boat the wind dropped. 
As soon as Jesus got in the boat the forces of evil cease. The force of hell shall not prevail over it.
33. The men in the boat bowed down before him and said: ¡Truly, you are the Son of God.’ 
Now comes that profession of faith which had been prepared in the preceding episode of the multiplication of the loaves, purified by the experience of getting away from the Bread of eternal life (Jn 6, 1-14). Now Peter can also confirm his brothers in faith, after the trial.

5. For those who wish to go deeper into the text
Jesus, man of prayer
Jesus prays in solitude and at night (Mt 14, 23; Mk 1, 35; Lk 5, 16), during the time of meals (Mt 14, 19; 15, 36; 26, 26-27). On the occasion of important events: for Baptism (Lk 3, 21), before choosing the twelve (Lk 6, 12), before teaching how to pray (Lk 11, 1; Mt 6, 5); before the confession of Caesarea (Lk 9, 18); in the Transfiguration (Lk 9, 28-29), in Gethsemane (Mt 26, 36-44); on the Cross (Mt 27, 46; Lk 23, 46). He prays for his executioners (Lk 23, 34); for Peter (Lk 22, 32), for his disciples and for those who will follow him (Jn 17, 9-24). He also prays for himself (Mt 26, 39; Jn 17, 1-5; Heb 5, 7). He teaches to pray (Mt 6, 5), He manifests a permanent relationship with the Father (Mt 11, 25-27), sure that He never leaves him alone (Jn 8, 29), and always hears him (Jn 11, 22.42; Mt 26, 53). He has promised (Jn 14, 16) to continue to intercede in heaven (Rm 8, 34; Heb 7, 25; I Jn 2, 1).
6. Oratio: Psalm 33

I will praise Yahweh from my heart;
let the humble hear and rejoice.

Proclaim with me the greatness of Yahweh,
let us acclaim his name together.

I seek Yahweh and he answers me,
frees me from all my fears.

Fix your gaze on Yahweh and your face will grow bright,
you will never hang your head in shame.

A pauper calls out and Yahweh hears,
saves him from all his troubles.

The angel of Yahweh encamps around those who fear him,
and rescues them.

Taste and see that Yahweh is good.
How blessed are those who take refuge in him.

Fear Yahweh, you his holy ones;
those who fear him lack for nothing.
7. Contemplatio
Lord Jesus, sometimes we are full of enthusiasm and forget that You are the source of our joy: In the moments of sadness we do not seek you or we want your miraculous intervention. Now we know that you never abandon us, that we should not fear. Prayer is also our force. Increase our faith, we are ready to risk our life for your Kingdom.